Speaker Series: The New Geopolitics of Energy

On September 17th, Delta Phi Epsilon had the honor of hosting acclaimed journalist Steve LeVine, who led a discussion on the geopolitical implications of the recent technological progress in energy extraction technology.

According to Mr. LeVine, two developments stand to reshape world energy markets and international politics: the extraction of shale natural gas and shale oil as well as ultra-deep-water energy exploration. Over the past decade, American energy companies have pioneered the economical extraction of oil and natural gas from the Earth’s shale. This new supply is on the verge of making the United States self-reliant consumer — perhaps even a large exporter — of natural gas. Similarly, by 2020, according to a Citi Bank projection cited by Mr. LeVine, due to shale oil in the United States as well as Canadian tar sands, the Western Hemisphere may become a major exporter of oil.

Steve LeVine begins his discussion on the new geopolitics of energy at the Elliott School of International Affairs.

Steve LeVine begins his discussion on the new geopolitics of energy at the Elliott School of International Affairs.

The new energy supply flooding world markets, however, will not only come from North America. The technological advancements that have allowed the United States and Mexico to increase deep-sea oil and gas production in the Gulf of Mexico are slowly spreading around the world. Now, formerly unknown or inaccessible reserves in African countries such as in Mozambique and Tanzania or South American countries like Guyana stand to further expand the world’s supply of fossil fuels.

In light of this new supply, according to Mr. Levine, we may be entering an era defined by the “Geopolitics of Plenty.” Previous reserves destined to the large American market as well as incoming American exports, are begging to end up in Europe and Asia reducing the relative influence of energy exporting countries, particularly Russia. At the same time, the increase in oil supplies will further erode OPEC’s quasi-monopoly on oil production.

Over hundred people–including students, faculty, embassy personnel and engineers–listen to Steve LeVine's presentation on energy.

A fascinating question, though, arises about the role of China in the new geopolitical situation. Geologists claim that there is a strong possibility that China may possess large reserves of shale natural gas. What is uncertain is whether China will be able to access the technology, capital, and managerial expertise necessary to unleash its energy resources. Should this happen, China may shift away from burning highly polluting coal to satisfy its energy needs. In turn, such a development may — at least temporarily — abate the looming threat of worsening climate change. Ironically, China may become one of the harbingers of a greener and healthier global economy moving forward in the 21st century.

After outlining this argument, Mr. LeVine led a vigorous and engaging conversation about the future of energy and its influence on geopolitics and global issues such as climate change. The discussion facilitated the sharing of ideas between Mr. LeVine, the GW community, as well as representatives from embassies of China, Russia, and the United Kingdom. The size and diversity of the guests — more than 100 people participated — highlights the importance of energy issues on the global affairs.

After the presentation, a student asks a question and engages in a discussion with Steve LeVine and others attending the event.

Delta Phi Epsilon is proud to host such a successful event and gracious to Mr. Steve LeVine for leading it.

Mr. LeVine is an adjunct professor of energy security at Georgetown University and a Bernard L. Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation. Until recently Mr. LeVine was a managing editor of Foreign Policy magazine and author of their energy security blog, “The Oil and the Glory.” He served as a foreign correspondent for 18 years in the Soviet Union, Pakistan and the Philippines, for The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Financial Times, and Newsweek. He has authored two books: The Oil and the Glory (2007) and Putin’s Labyrinth (2008).

 

The Media, the Internet, and Terrorism

The Media, the Internet, and Terrorism

Tuesday, November 1st 7:00pm

Funger Hall – Room 103

Delta Phi Epsilon, Professional Foreign Service Fraternity and Sorority, present ‘The Internet, The Media’, and Terrorism featuring Professor Raphael Cohen-Almagor.

After receiving his Doctorate in Political Theory from Oxford University, Professor Cohen-Almagor founded the Medical Ethics Think Tank at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute and was a Fellow at The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, as well as a member of the Israel Press Council. In addition, he founded the Center for Democratic Studies at the University of Haifa in Israel. Currently, Professor Cohen-Almagor is the Politics Chair at The University of Hull in the United Kingdom and a member of The International Standing Group on Extremism and Democracy. Finally, Professor Cohen-Almagor serves as a member on The International Human Rights Tribunal.

Professor Cohen-Almagor will incorporate his vast experience in international relations and journalism to share his insight on terrorism and the internet in the twenty-first century.

This event is hosted in collaboration with Stand With Us, The World Zionist Organization, The Israeli Embassy, and GW Coalition for Israeli Activists.

 

Fall 2011 Rush Schedule

We are proud to announce our events open to the public that are also part of our fall recruitment process. Prospective candidates are encouraged to attend these events to meet current brothers. Interested candidates will then be notified about further “invitation only” events.

Fall 2011 Rush has begun!

Reconstruction and Beyond: The Great East Japan Earthquake and its Implications

Friday, September 9th 2:30-4:15pm
Reception to follow.

Harry Harding Auditorium (Room 213) at the Elliott School of International Affairs

Commentated by Dr. Atusushi Seiki (Keio University) and Dr. Edward J. Lincoln (The George Washington University).
Dr. Atsushi Seike is a member of the Prime Minister’s Reconstruction Design Council in Response to the Great East Japan Earthquake.  After serving as faculty member and dean of Keio’s Faculty of Business and Commerce, Dr. Seike became President of Keio University in 2009. He is a labor economist. His books Labor Market in the Aging Society, Employment System Reform for the Aging People, and The Economics of Older Workers received prestigious awards including the Keio Gijuku Academic Prize and the Kagami Memorial Award.

Sponsored by The Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Elliott School of International Affairs with co-sponsorship from the U.S. – Japan Research Institute (USJI) and the cooperation of the Japanese American Student Union of DC and Delta Phi Epsilon.

Internship Panel

Monday, September 12th 6:00pm

Room Change: Now 113 at the Elliott School of International Affairs

Come interact with a panel containing recent Alumni who will talk about their experiences getting internships on Capitol Hill, the Department of Defense, defense contracting firms, and the non-profit sector. Come hear what it takes to get an internship in their fields and tips on what you can do now to make yourself the most attractive candidate for the job.

Marshall’s Social Event

Monday, September 19th 7:00-9:00PM
Marshall’s Bar and Grille at 2525 L Street, NW

Join the Brothers of Eta Chapter of Delta Phi Epsilon for  free food, soda, and mingling in an informal setting at Marshall’s Bar and Grille. This is a great opportunity to meet the Brothers and learn about Delta Phi Epsilon at GW, while enjoying great wings and food. This is an informal event to allow prospectives and brothers to get to know one another, and we encourage everyone to come for the free food and good company.


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Mideast Winners

The winners for the 2nd Annual DPE Award for Excellence in Middle Eastern Affairs have been announced! Out of 40 essays submitted, these three undergraduate students’ essays stood out in terms of both content and composition. The winner receives $300, while the two runners-up each receive $100. DPE would like to thank the Middle East Policy Forum for funding and supporting this award.

Congratulations to the winners!

Winner:

Joshua Haber- Origins & Development of Egyptian National Identity

First Runner Up:

Behnam Ben Taleblu- Behnam Ben Taleblu

Second Runner Up:

Rachel Steyer- Islamic Feminism: A Revision

 

The submission deadline for the Second Annual Delta Phi Epsilon Middle East Essay Contest has been extended until April 1st at 5p.m. Submissions must be emailed to mideast@gwdpe.org.

The first prize winner will be awarded $300. Two runners up will be awarded $100 each.

For Additional Rules: 2011 Middle East Essay Contest

 

DPE Announces Fall 2010 Recruitment Schedule!

We are proud to announce our two events open to the public that are also part of our fall recruitment process. Prospective candidates are encouraged to attend these events to meet current brothers. Interested candidates will then be notified about further “invitation only” events.

Internship Panel:

Monday, September 13th 6:30pm RSVP

Lindner Family Commons (Room 602) at the Elliott School of International Affairs

Come interact with a panel containing current brothers and recent Alumni who will talk about their experiences getting internships on Capitol Hill, the Department of Defense, defense contracting firms, and the non-profit sector. Come hear what it takes to get an internship in their fields and tips on what you can do now to make yourself the most attractive candidate for the job.

Professor Wes Reisser: GW alum discusses his experiences from undergrad to working for the State Department

Thursday September 16th 6:00pm

Room 505 at the Elliott School of International Affairs

Professor Reisser is a member of the State Department’s civil service, where he has worked mostly on Middle Eastern issues, first serving as the Consular Desk Officer for Israel, Egypt, Yemen, and the United Arab Emirates, and then as a Desk Officer in the Office of Israel & Palestinian Affairs. Over the course of his time at the State Department Professor Reisser has had a range of responsibilities including work on the peace process, human rights issues, consular issues and political-military issues between Israel and the U.S.  Currently Professor Reisser is teaching several geography courses at the George Washington University including courses on political geography and energy resources

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Delta Phi Epsilon, the Professional Foreign Service Fraternity is calling for submissions for the Delta Phi Epsilon Award for Excellence in Middle Eastern Affairs. This Award competition is meant to highlight outstanding research by undergraduate students in the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University. The winning essay will be highlighted at an award ceremony in late April 2010.

Criteria

  • Essays will be no longer than 15 Pages in length, double-spaced, 12 point font.
  • Essays will be focused on the Middle East region.
  • Essays will be judged on content and composition.
  • Essays can be from former or current classwork.

Prize

  • 1st Prize: $300
  • 2 Runners Up: $100 each.

Deadline

Friday, April 16 by 5pm.
Essays can be submitted by email to mideast@gwdpe.org
.

 

Winter 2010 Events Posted

The Eta Chapter’s public event schedule for winter 2010 is now available online! Please see http://www.gwdpe.org/news/events

 

Eta Chapter Launches New Website

The Eta Chapter of Delta Phi Epsilon has launched its new website, www.gwdpe.org, as part of the organization’s new public relations campaign. New features will be added over this week, including issues of the chapter newsletter, The Clipper, and information for alumni and current brothers.

The Brothers of Eta Chapter hope that the new site will support the group’s efforts to promote a community of scholars in The Elliott School of International Affairs.